Fourteen ambulances were sent to Birmingham Major Incident say ambulance service – UKNIP
Birmingham BREAKING West Midlands

Fourteen ambulances were sent to Birmingham Major Incident say ambulance service

A large number of ambulance resources were sent to Birmingham City Centre overnight after a series of stabbing incidents.

We received multiple calls to three locations over a period of an hour and twenty minutes. The initial call was to the junction of Colmore Row / Livery Street at 12.40am, with further incident sites at Irving Street at 1.52am and Hurst Street at 2.00am.

A total of 14 ambulances were sent to the scene along with eleven paramedic officers, the Hazardous Area Response Team, four critical care teams with doctors and critical care paramedics. 

A team of St John Ambulance volunteers at the SafeSpace project at the Arcadian were also involved in treating casualties and conveyed one of the patients.

Ambulance staff treated a total of seven patients:

  • Five patients were taken to the major trauma centre at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham. Three had suffered critical injuries and sadly, a man died shortly after arrival.
  • Two further patients with non life-threatening injuries were also taken to Heartlands Hospital for treatment.

An eighth patient with minor injuries did not receive ambulance treatment.

The Trust went to major incident standby with further ambulances sent to standby in the area should then have been needed. Senior officers including the Chief Executive also attended Trust Headquarters to co-ordinate the Trust response.

Assistant Chief Ambulance Officer, Nathan Hudson, said: “This was clearly a very serious situation with a large number of patients, some with very serious injuries. 

“My thoughts are with the families of those hurt, particularly of the man who tragically lost his life.

“I must pay tribute to the ambulance staff who worked so hard at the scene and en-route to hospital, to help each of the patients hurt.

“We train for incidents like this on a regular basis which meant that we were able to get a large number of ambulance resources into the scene very rapidly so that patients got the care they needed as quickly as possible.”

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