BREAKING ISLEWORTH LONDON

A former music teacher has been jailed for 17 years after being found guilty of sexual offences against young girls

 

Ben Breakwell, 40  of Monkgate, York, appeared at Isleworth Crown Court on Thursday, 2 December, where he was sentenced to 17 years’ imprisonment years for 32 sexual offences. He will also be on the sex offenders register for life. 

Breakwell had previously was convicted on Monday, 2 August following a trial at the same court, and had been remanded in custody to await sentencing.

From 2014 until the end of 2017, Breakwell worked at a school in west London.

During trial the court heard how he had abused his position as a music teacher to engage his young pupils in sexual activity.

The 32 offences related to sexual activity with three girls whose ages ranged from 13 to 16 and indecent images of a fourth.

As Breakwell’s offences came to light, a pattern emerged showing how he carefully groomed the girls in order take advantage of them. He had begun a full sexual relationship with two of his victims when they were aged just 13 and 14.

In September 2017, the friends of one of the victims approached a member of school staff. They told him of their suspicion about an inappropriate relationship involving Breakwell.

The school immediately suspended him, police were alerted and an investigation began, led by specialist officers from the West Area Basic Command Unit.

Breakwell was arrested in November 2017 and a subsequent search of his computer uncovered indecent images of another victim who lived abroad. This girl was successfully identified and traced by detectives and she and her family were spoken to.

In February 2020 Breakwell was charged with multiple sexual offences.

Detective Sergeant Ben Lawrence-Smith, who work on the investigation, said: “Breakwell is a sexual predator, who targeted vulnerable children. I am very pleased that he has been removed to a place where he can’t cause further harm to children.

“The girls who were betrayed by Breakwell were incredibly brave in coming forward. Without their courage he could not have been brought to justice.

“As a teacher he had a duty of care to the girls, but instead he betrayed their trust in order to abuse them. He manipulated and exploited them and convinced them that what was taking place was not abuse, but love.

“I understand that it can be difficult for victims of sexual offences to speak out, but keeping abuse secret only protects the abuser.

“I urge anyone who believes they are at risk from, or have been a victim of abuse, to tell someone – a parent, a carer or ideally someone in authority, but please do speak to someone.“