BREAKING HAMPSHIRE

Increase seen in Scarlet Fever Reports in Hampshire and the Isle Of Wight

increase seen in scarlet fever reports in hampshire and the isle of wight

GPs across Hampshire and the Isle of Wight have noticed an increase in the number of reports of scarlet fever. However, scarlet fever, also called scarlatina, isn’t usually serious and can be treated with antibiotics from your GP.

Scarlet fever causes a blotchy, pink-red rash and early symptoms are sore throat, headache, fever, nausea and vomiting. Most common in young children, it can affect people of any age. Once you’ve had it, you’re unlikely to get it again.
As with most things, good hygiene practice such as hand washing remains the most important step in preventing and controlling spread of infection.

Scarlet fever, also called scarlatina, is an infection that causes a blotchy, pink-red rash. It’s most common in young children, but can affect people of any age.

It isn’t usually serious and can be treated with antibiotics from your GP. Once you’ve had it, you’re unlikely to get it again.

Symptoms of scarlet fever
Symptoms of scarlet fever develop within a week of being infected.

Early signs include a sore throat, a headache, a high temperature (38.3C/101F or above), swollen glands in the neck and being sick.

This may be followed by a rash on the body, a red face and a white or red tongue: